Google+ Badge BLACK SOCIAL HISTORY

Wednesday, 26 March 2014

BLACK SOCIAL HISTORY : AFRICAN AMERICAN " JEHOISE "JAY" HEARD " WAS AN AMERICAN PROFESSIONAL BASE BALL PLAYER AND A NATIVE OF ATHENS, GEORGIA, HE WAS A LEFT HANDED PITCHER : GOES INTO THE " HALL OF BLACK GENIUS "

                                       BLACK                 SOCIAL           HISTORY                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                       Jehosie "Jay" Heard (January 17, 1920 – November 18, 1999) was an American professional baseball player. A native of Athens, Georgia, he was aleft-handed pitcher who stood 5 feet 7 inches (1.70 m) tall and weighed 155 pounds (70 kg). He pitched two games in Major League Baseball for the1954 Baltimore Orioles.
Heard began his pro career in the Negro Leagues after serving in the United States Army during World War II.[1] During his career in the Negro Leagues, he pitched for the Birmingham Black BaronsMemphis Red SoxHouston Eagles and New Orleans Eagles.[2] In 1952, at age 32, he joined the organized minor leagues, winning 20 games for the Victoria Tyees of the Class A Western International League.[3] Promoted the following season to the top level of the minors, the Open Classification Pacific Coast League, Heard won 16 games for the Portland Beavers.[3] The Orioles, newly transplanted to Baltimore as the former St. Louis Browns, purchased Heard's contract that winter.
Heard was a member of the first Baltimore team to play in the American League since 1902. He made two appearances for the 1954 Orioles as a relief pitcher, both times against the Chicago White Sox. In his April 24 debut, he faced four batters and retired all of them.[4] But in his second game, more than a month later on May 28, Heard allowed six hits and five runs, all earned, in two innings. A grand slam home run by Chicago's light-hitting Cass Michaels was the most damaging blow.[5]
He then returne[3]






























d to the minors, where he pitched at the upper levels through 1957.