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Thursday, 30 May 2013

BLACK SOCIAL HISTORY : AUSTRALIAN RULES FOOTBALL PLAYER - AFRO-AUSTRALIAN NICHOLAS WINMAR - WHO WITH ONE GESTURE CHANGE THE NAME OF THE RACIST GAME IN AUSTRALIA : A BRAVE BLACK MAN :






















Nicholas Winmar born 27 April 1991 is an Australian rules footballer who played for St Kilda in the Australian Football League (AFL).
Winmar is the second cousin of former St Kilda and Western Bulldogs player Nicky Winmar. St Kilda drafted him with the 32nd selection in the 2009 AFL Draft from Claremont Football Club in the West Australian Football League (WAFL).
Winmar made his debut in Round 9 of the 2011 AFL season against the Melbourne Football Club and played the following week against Fremantle Football Club before being dropped back to the Victorian Football League (VFL). Winmar was then named as an emergency several times towards the end of the 2011 season.
On Tuesday, the 27th of November, the Saints announced they had delisted Winmar. St Kilda's head of football, Chris Pelchen, said Winmar was contracted until the end of 2013, however, the club advised the 21-year-old that he would be released.


Footy's Black Power moment

Gilbert McAdam tells the story of Nicky Winmar's famous gesture at Victoria Park
Gilbert McAdam at Victoria Park where he kicked five goals on the day Nicky Winmar famously st to racist taunts. Picture: Darren Tindale Source: Herald Sun

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Nicky Winmar
Nicky Winmar's gesture at Victoria Park in 1993 starting the process towards eradicating racism in the AFL. Source: Herald Sun
FORMER ST Kilda player Gilbert McAdam has detailed the ugly catalyst to Nick Winmar's gesture that changed the game forever.
Winmar has never spoken in detail about the racism he and McAdam were subjected to by Collingwood fans at Victoria Park in 1993.
McAdam, who kicked five goals in a best-afield display, returned to Victoria Park yesterday for the first time since the incident.
It is credited with starting the process towards eradicating racism in the AFL.
"All I know is I wanted to make a statement that day," the former Saints and Brisbane Bears player told the Herald Sun as part of the Football Revolution series.
"When the reserves used to play before the AFL, we used to go on to the oval at halftime to see how wet it was or how the ball bounced.
"We were walking out the race at Victoria Park and you came up on to the Collingwood cheer squad and straight away they started on us. I started to get angry and then I said to myself, 'There is no point getting angry. Don't worry about it'.
"When I got to the centre, I grabbed Nick and said, 'Boy, we have got to do something today. We have got to make a statement. We will show this mob ... we have got to make them quiet'."
"And that's basically it. I didn't know it (the gesture) was going to happen, but it happened," McAdam said
McAdam compared Winmar's gesture to the black power salute of the 1968 Mexico Olympics, of which American 200m gold medallist Tommie Smith later said. "We are black and we are proud of being black".
Both St Kilda players played brilliant games - McAdam was awarded three Brownlow votes and Winmar two - with Winmar stating "I'm proud to be black" on the siren before hugging McAdam in the centre square.
"It was terrible," McAdam said yesterday of the racist abuse.
"I didn't know until after the game that Nick had lifted his jumper, but he was showing them he was proud of the colour of his skin because they were calling us everything, and that's why he said it.
"His finger did the talking and the a lking. That's a powerful statement."