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Wednesday, 7 October 2015

BLACK SOCIAL HISTORY : BLACK POWER MOVEMENT WAS A POLITICAL MOVEMENT IN THE 1960's ON WARDS :

             BLACK   SOCIAL  HISTORY                                                                                                                






















































































































































Black Power movement


Black Power movement
Part of Black Power
Black-Panther-Party-armed-guards-in-street-shotguns.jpg
Black Panthers standing guard with shotguns
DateLate 1960s to Today
LocationMainly the USA
CausesRacism in the United States
GoalsBlack empowerment
MethodsOccupationsArmed RevoltsProtest
StatusWeakened but Ongoing
Parties to the civil conflict
Gangs
Insurgents
Black Radical Congress
Communist Party USA
League of Revolutionary Black Workers
New Black Panther Party
Lead figures
Various leaders
Huey P. Newton
Donald DeFreeze
Bill Ayers
Pun Plamondon
John Africa
Government Leaders
(President of the United States)
Police Leaders
The Black Power movement was a political movement to achieve a form of Black Power and the many philosophies it contains. The movement saw various forms of activism some violent and some peaceful, all hoping to achieve black empowerment. The Black Power movement did not solely represent Black supremacy movements but also socialist ones all with the general motivation of improving the standing of black people in society.[1]

History

Beginning and Peak

The first popular use of the term "Black Power" as a social and racial slogan was by Stokely Carmichael (later known as Kwame Ture) and Willie Ricks (later known as Mukasa Dada), both organizers and spokespersons for the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC). On June 16, 1966, in a speech in Greenwood, Mississippi after the shooting of James Meredith during the March Against Fear, Stokely Carmichael used the term.[2][3]
By the late 1960s Black Power came to represent the demand for more immediate violent action to counter american white supremacy. Most of these ideas were influenced by Malcolm X's criticism of Martin Luther King, Jr.'s peaceful protest methods. The 1965 assassination of Malcolm X coupled with the urban uprisings of 1964 and 1965 ignited the Black Power movement. By 1968 Black Power was a recognizable movement with a growing force of people who sympathize. New organizations began to form such as the Black Panther Party each supporting Black Power philosophies ranging from socialism to black nationalism.[4]Each organization promoting illegal protest as a way to achieve their goals.[5] Over time recognizable actions and protest began to take shape such as the Black Panther's armed Oakland patrols. Some of these actions created for the first time, blacks in the United States to acknowledge their African heritage. Colleges and Universities established black studies programs and black studies departments.[6] Other organizations such as the Symbionese Liberation Army committed bank robberies and armed take overs.
In Trinidad the black power movement had escalated into the Black Power Revolution in which many Afro-Trinidadians in which the government of Trinidad eventually gave into reforms by 1970.

Decline and Today

After the 1970s the Black Power movement saw a decline but not an end. Other organizations formed such as MOVE and continued to engage in violent action such as the MOVE bombing. Some even compare today's Black Lives Matter movement to the black power movement.[7] Today less socialistic organizations have taken power such as the New Black Panther Party often supporting Black nationalism.