Google+ Badge BLACK SOCIAL HISTORY

Thursday, 18 February 2016

BLACK SOCIAL HISTORY - AFRO-SIERRA LEONEAN " MACOEMACK CHARLES FARRELL EASMON " WAS A PHYSICIAN AND WAS THE FIRST WEST AFRICAN TO SERVE AS CHIEF MEDICAL OFFICER OF A BRITISH WEST AFRICAN TERRITORY - GOES INTO THE " HALL OF BLACK GENIUS "

                                                      BLACK      SOCIAL      HISTORY                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                







































Macormack Charles Farrell Easmon
Macormack Charles Farrell Easmon
McCormack Easmon.jpg
Dr. M.C.F. Easmon, standing on the right
Born Macormack Charles Farrell Easmon
11 April 1890
Freetown, Sierra Leone
Died 2 May 1972
Surrey, England
Nickname M.C.F., Charlie
Occupation Physician
Language English
Nationality British Subject, Sierra Leonean
Ethnicity Creole
Education CMS Grammar School, Imperial University
Spouse Enid Winifred Shorunukeh-Sawyerr
Macormack Charles Farrell Easmon, OBE, popularly known as M.C.F. Easmon or "Charlie" (11 April 1890 – 2 May 1972), was born in Accra in the Gold Coast (modern-day Ghana), where his father John Farrell Easmon, a prominent Creole doctor, was working at the time.[1]

Contents  [hide] 
1 Background and early life
2 Education
3 Personal life
4 Retirement and legacy
5 Trivia
6 References
7 External links
Background and early life[edit]
Macormack Charles Farrell Easmon was born on 11 April 1890 in Accra, Gold Coast, to Dr. John Farrell Easmon and his wife, Kathleen Annette Easmon (née Smith). Macormack Easmon descended from prominent Sierra Leonean families and had numerous ancestors who distinguished themselves in the civil service and medical field. Easmon was named "McCormack" or "MacCormac" after his great-grandfather John MacCormac, who was the uncle of Dr. William MacCormac.

Dr. John Farrell Easmon (1856-1900) was a prominent Sierra Leonean doctor with a distinguished medical career who was the first West African to serve as Chief Medical Officer of a British West African territory. The Easmon family descended from the original settlers of the Freetown Colony, the Nova Scotian Settlers. Macormack Easmon's paternal uncle was Dr. Albert Whiggs Easmon, a prominent gynaecologist in Freetown. Through his maternal lineage, Dr. J. F. Easmon was descended from the MacCormac family and was a nephew of Sir William MacCormac.

Kathleen Annette Smith (1870-1951) was the daughter of William Smith Esq. and Anne Smith (née Spilsbury). William Smith Jr. was the son of Judge William Smith, a Yorkshireman who settled on the Gold Coast and was a judge in the Mixed Commissionary Court in Freetown. Anne Spilsbury was the daughter of Joseph Green Spilsbury and Hannah Carew. J. G. Spilsbury's father was Dr. George Green Spilsbury, a distant relative of Bernard Spilsbury, and Elizabeth "Betsy" Fowler, a Jamaican Maroon woman. Hannah Carew was the daughter of Thomas and Betsy Carew, both Liberated Africans.

Education[edit]
Easmon was educated for six months at the CMS Grammar School in Freetown and later at Colet Court School, the preparatory school for St Paul's Preparatory School in London. He went on to attend Epsom College in Surrey. After graduating in 1907, Macormack Easmon was awarded a scholarship to study medicine at the Medical School of St. Mary's Hospital in London.

After a distinguished academic career, Easmon qualified in medicine and surgery in 1912, and in the following year passed the examination of the London School of Tropical Medicine.

Personal life[edit]
In 1920, Easmon married Enid Winifred Shorunukeh-Sawyerr, daughter of a prominent Creole family. They had one child, Dr Charles Syrett Farrell Easmon, who is a professor in medical studies in the United Kingdom.

Retirement and legacy[edit]
As a member of the Sierra Leone Society, he spearheaded the founding of the Sierra Leone Museum in 1958 and became its first curator. Easmon was also instrumental in the Monuments and Relics Commission alongside other Sierra Leoneans such as Dr. Ernest Jenner Wright and Wilmot A. Dillsworth, a Freetown city town clerk. Easmon worked relentlessly to acquire worthy exhibits for the museum and to set up attractive displays. He also hosted a popular radio programme called Sierra Leone in Retrospect.

In 1954, Dr. Easmon was awarded the Order of the British Empire (OBE).