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Sunday, 21 July 2013

BLACK SOCIAL HISTORY : AFRICAN AMERICAN THIRD BASE MAN, FIRST BASE MAN IN THE NEGRO LEAGUE ERNEST JUDSON WILSON NICK NAME "BOOJUM"

                        BLACK             SOCIAL              HISTORY                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                   Ernest Judson Wilson  February 28, 1894 – June 24, 1963, nicknamed "Boojum," was an American third baseman, first baseman, and manager in Negro league baseball. Born in Remington, Virginia, he served in World War I, and during his career played primarily for the Baltimore Black Sox (1922–30), Homestead Grays (1931–32, 1940–45), and Philadelphia Stars (1933–39). One of the Negro leagues' most powerful hitters, his career batting average of .351 ranks him among the top five players. He also enjoyed remarkable success in the Cuban Winter League in the 1920s. He was elected to the Baseball Hall of Fame in 2006.
Wilson got his nickname "Boojum" because that was the noise his line drives made when they hit the outfield walls. Pitcher













































 Satchel Paige claimed that Wilson and Chino Smith were the two toughest outs he ever faced (Wilson hit .375 against Paige). Catcher Josh Gibson believed that Wilson was a better hitter than he was.
Wilson died at age 69 in Washington, D.C. and was buried in Arlington National Cemetery.