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Sunday, 24 August 2014

BLACK SOCIAL HISTORY : WHAT HAPPEN TO THE BABIES FATHERED BY BLACK GIs AND GERMAN WOMEN AFTER WWII ?

BLACK       SOCIAL          HISTORY                                                                           What Happened to the Babies Fathered by Black GIs and German Women After WWII?


Few people bat an eye when they see German supermodel Heidi Klum hand in hand with the biracial children she has with black British husband Seal. But during the years after World War II, the German women who had children with African-American GIs ended up putting them up for adoption for fear that the babies would be stigmatized in German society. As it was, their white mothers faced hostility from the community for giving birth to children known as "mischlingskinder," a slur for biracial children, CNN reports. And when the black GIs moved out of Germany or were reassigned to other military bases after their romances with white women came to light, the women left behind had few people to turn to for support. Ultimately, thousands of mixed-race German children were put up for adoption. Many ended up in the homes of African-American military families.
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Looking for a Bi/Gay Affair ? So is everyone else here."Mischlingskinder Story" filmmaker Regina Griffin considers the stories of Germany's brown babies "not just African-American history, it's not just American history, it's world history," she told CNN. "There were a lot of people who were caught between two countries, two warring nations. And we allowed those children to be abandoned, and people should know that."Although I knew that the mixed-race children of American GIs and Vietnamese women were put up for adoption, the CNN report marks the first time I've heard this heartbreaking story about biracial German children being giving away. Thanks to the films "Brown Babies: The Mischlingskinder Story" and "Brown Babies: Germany's Lost Children," more awareness is being raised about this tragic time in history.
As adults, many of the so-called "brown babies" have reconnected with their birth parents, but some are still searching or lost the opportunity when their birth parents died.
"People's mothers are passing away, their fathers are passing away, and people are starting to wonder who they are," former "brown baby" Henriette Cain told CNN. Cain now lives in Illinois. "Now even we are passing away, and it's a story that needs to be told."