Google+ Badge BLACK SOCIAL HISTORY

Friday, 15 March 2013

BLACK SOCIAL HISTORY : AFRICAN AMERICAN AND VETERAN OF WARS GONE PAST AND CURRENT :

Following the Second World War the G.I.  Bill of Rights greatly expanded the population of African American attending college and graduate school forming a crack in wall of the prevailing Social Climate that existed in the United States after the World War 11 one in which Racism was a prominent factor African American did not Benefit from the provision of the G.I. Bill as much as there White counterpart. Though the Bill provided on a level playing field than the one Blacks faced during Reconstruction. Representative John  Ranking an Economic Liberal who was an avid Segregationist and Racist sponsored the Bill in the United States House of Representative. All though the Law did not specially advocate discrimination, the Social Climate of the time dictated that the law would be interpreted differently for Blacks than for White.




































 Not only did Blacks face discrimination once they returned home after the war, the poverty confronting most Blacks during the 1940's and the 1950's represented another barrier to harnessing the benefits of the G.I. Bill as it made it problematic to seek an Education while labor and income were needed at home. The relationship between United States Department  of Veterans Affair and its strong affiliation to the White American Legion and the Veterans Of Foreign Wars also became a formidable foe to many Blacks in search of an Education because it had the power to deny or grant the claims of Black G.I. s  additional bank and mortgage refused loans to Blacks making the G.I. Bill even less effective for Blacks.